311 x Method Man & Redman w/ The Green, Dizzy Wright, Jesse Royal - 420 Eve On The Rocks @ RED ROCKS AMPHITHEATRE

LivWell Presents

311 x Method Man & Redman w/ The Green, Dizzy Wright, Jesse Royal - 420 Eve On The Rocks @ RED ROCKS AMPHITHEATRE

Fri · April 19, 2019

Doors: 5:30 pm / Show: 6:30 pm (event ends at 11:30 pm)

$59.95 - $150.00

This event is all ages

311
311
311 was formed in 1990 in Omaha, Nebraska by singer/guitarist Nick Hexum, singer S.A. Martinez, guitarist Tim Mahoney, drummer Chad Sexton and bassist P-Nut. The band now resides in Southern California.

311 mix rock, rap, reggae and funk into their own unique hybrid sound - and have developed a reputation as one of the most entertaining & dynamic live bands in the U.S.

311 is currently in the studio in Fall/Winter 2017, working on a new album aiming for a late Spring 2019 release, their second for BMG Records.

311 released their 12th studio album, MOSAIC, in June 2017, which debuted at #6 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart, marking the band’s 10th consecutive Top 10 album.

311have released twelve studio albums, two greatest hits albums, two live albums, three DVD's and a boxed-set-and have sold nearly 10 million copies in the U.S. Their last ten albums reached the Top 10 on Billboard's Top 200 Sales Chart - and nine of their singles have reached the Top 10 on Billboard's Alternative Radio Chart (including three #1 singles Down, Love Song & Don't Tread On Me - along with Amber, All Mixed Up, Come Original, Creatures For Awhile, Hey You and Sunset in July).

In celebration of 25 years as a band, 311 released the 311 ARCHIVE boxed-set in June 2015 -featuring 4 CD's (81 tracks of B-sides, bonus tracks, pre-production recordings and demos from 1992-2014) plus a 60 page book of rare photos and memorabilia.
Method Man
Method Man
In the dark, womb-like sanctuary of Jimi Hendrix's Electric Lady studios in downtown Manhattan-a place that has birthed historical musical moments-sits the artist known as Iron Lung, Tical, Wu Brother #1, Johnny Blaze, and of course...Method Man. With a trusty, half-lit blunt by his side, he is lounging in front of white grand piano, his hands sweeping the keyboards, trying to remember a tune he memorized years ago.

Maybe the idea of one of hip hop's finest-and grimiest-emcees tickling the ivories sounds odd, or out of place, but Mr. Mef has never been the type to fit in. His husky, guttural voice is perhaps the most distinct in the game, his flow-dark and complex like the graphic novels from which he took his moniker from-can bury itself in cinematic tracks from RZA, complement the voices of R&B divas and or attack party tracks from Rocwilder. Whether he is trading verses with partner in rhyme, Redman, crowd surfing at a Wu Tang show, or stealing a scene in various television shows and films, Method Man is a true individual spirit. With his latest album, 4:21, The Day After, he is also focused on being a true artist.

Unlike some previous efforts-where Meth admits his priorities were different-on this new album, he says he's focusing on lyrics. After his last album, Tical O: The Prequel, he went through an especially rough time in his life-both personally and professionally-which provided him with a bulk of material. "I had a lot on my mind at the time and the second thing was, I decided to really talk about something and I had a lot to draw from and when the pen hit the paper it was like damn, remember this? And by the time I was done it was like shit, let's go." The result is his most personal and introspective work yet.

Doing the work behind the boards on 4:21, are Wu Tang mastermind and long-time collaborator, RZA as well as Scott Storch, Havoc, K1 and Eric Sermon. "With Eric, we did three songs in three days," Meth says with an amazed smile, "He just comes in with ideas of top. And with RZA, shit, I've watched him build tracks from scratch, so all I really have to do is put the pen to the paper". Eric Sermon provided the beat for Meth's first single, "Say", featuring Lauryn Hill. The track finds Meth addressing critics, fickle fans and haters for disrespecting him and his Wu Tang brethren.

"I've been venting about all this for years and [my manager] was like, 'Write about it, Eric has the perfect joint.' And, Lauryn Hill herself, she just had the raw emotion, the small things she said on the song was enough for me to push my pen and let myself be vulnerable." Meth says his ability to let himself be so open is in line with the entire concept of the album, and its title. "The national weed smoking day is 4/20, so I named my album 4/21 the day after. Because after that day, you have this moment of clarity when you're not high and you see things clearly." The Grammy-winner sighs and continues, a serious, determined look on his face. "You feel like you're not in on the joke, and everyone's laughing at you. I felt like no one was taking me seriously. I got real angry and I just starting writing."

Anger proved to be a great motivator, as the Ticalion Stallion wrapped up the album in a few short months. He says the creative process has been cathartic, and though his skin hasn't gotten any thicker, he's able to use his writing talent to inspire self-confidence. "It's real talk, I'm going to keep my spirits up and not let it get things to me. You know, if you start reading your own press and feeding into it, and you start questioning yourself, like, 'am I wack?' and you have to be like, 'No!' I learned to pat myself on the back, and that it's ok to pat myself on the back sometimes." We definitely agree.
Redman
Redman
New Jersey rapper Redman made his initial impact with Whut? Thee Album in 1992. He blended reggae and funk influences with topical commentary and displayed a terse, though fluid rap style that was sometimes satirical, sometimes tough, and sometimes silly. Redman returned in 1994 with his second album, Dare Iz a Darkside, which was a harder album than his debut. Muddy Waters, Redman's third album, followed in 1996; he returned two years later with Doc's Da Name. New album "Red Gone Wild" Thee Album in stores now
The Green
The Green
Since forming on O'ahu, Hawai'i, in 2009, The Green has become one of the most successful and beloved bands in the reggae genre. During their relatively short career, the band has been awarded a Best Reggae Album nod from iTunes (2010, for their self-titled debut), four coveted Na Hoku Hanohano awards in their native Hawai'i (2011 and 2014, including Group of the Year, two different Reggae Albums of the Year and Entertainer of the Year), and two #1 Billboard Reggae chart debuts, along with charting on the Billboard Top 200. Not bad for a band that was formed by six members of Hawai'i's tight-knit music scene to record a few songs and have some fun.
Dizzy Wright
Dizzy Wright
“You just don’t become a leader in one year. You’re prepped for it. When you’re at your lowest—but you got that faith—that gives you motivation. And when you have that motivation, that’s what makes you a leader,” says Las Vegas native Dizzy Wright. Beyond his years at 22, Dizzy has been one of the first Sin City rappers to grab the spotlight and carry it across the globe.

“My mom kicked me out when I was 17,” Dizzy reveals of the woman who both raised him and managed his career since childhood, “I was thrown out into the world.” With a similar story to his inspiration, Tupac Shakur, he took to local clubs to build a network and fan-base by being both skilled and flashy. “I was all about getting people to know my name. I knew the vision, but I didn’t know the gesture. You’ve got to live through this to get an understanding of it.” Along the way, Wright says that life taught him to keep a tight circle and to be concerned with how his music sounded in venues just as much as the writing. That dichotomy of substance and swagger has made Dizzy Wright an independent charting sensation with three 2012 releases, SmokeOut Conversations (along with the 200,000 times downloaded promotional mixtape), as well as a follow-up EP, The First Agreement. In turn, the youngest member of Funk Volume has been one of the most active.

Although SmokeOut Conversations could be dismissed as just marijuana music, the inspiration behind the concept is deeply personal to Dizzy. The rapper asserts, “I didn’t want people to perceive me as this weed rapper with a weed album.” Instead, he admits that a key moment in creating the album came from his first encounter with his father. “I did a show in Detroit with Hopsin, and I got to meet my father for the first time. I was trying to figure out what he was gonna be like. He went to jail a couple months before I was born, and then he got out 20 years later.” To buffer the circumstances, Dizzy and his Pops eased tensions with some help. “When I finally met him, all we did was smoke and talk.” “We just got to do a lot of catchin’ up, lotta talkin’, and lotta smokin’.” After his father traveled to several dates with the Funk Volume family, Dizzy left the experience with a title and theme for his debut album.

The independent album produced two multimillion-view videos on YouTube, “Solo Dolo” and “Can’t Trust Em.” Dizzy was specific in giving his expanding base both sides of his repertoire. The first was Dizzy’s most personal record, while the second had, what he calls “that now-sound.” Both resonated, and the rapper was able to go from “doing shows to doing concerts” in his relentless touring with label-mates. Reflecting, he notes, “I was just testing the waters.” Ready to fully jump in, Wright promises of his forthcoming work, “My next album will be the biggest one to date. It’ll be the perfect material for the fans, ‘cause I understand everything a lot more.”

Like his idol, Dizzy Wright embodies a do-for-self journey that’s magnetized listeners with his natural charisma. Perhaps with a cloudy chorus or a bassline to make it digestible, he’s leading a new charge. “’Pac’s passion gives me passion. I don’t wanna be just one of these niggas just talkin’.” In life and in music, already he’s saying much more.
Jesse Royal
Jesse Royal
With popular mixtapes, hit singles and now his debut album, Jesse Royal is establishing himself as one of the next reggae superstars to emerge from Jamaica. Jesse's reputation has been steadily building over the past half-decade. His versatile singjay style recalls some of the giants of reggae history, but Jesse’s diverse musical taste and restless artistic spirit have set him on a unique path that is helping propel the genre into new territory. Focusing on what has worked in recent years in the reggae scene – from the heavy touring, DIY-aesthetics of the U.S. reggae movement to the Sound System and bass culture influences of the U.K. scene – he’s ready to apply all his experiences along the way to his own journey. Jesse Royal’s time is now.
Venue Information:
Red Rocks Amphitheatre
18300 W. Alameda Parkway
Morrison, CO, 80465
http://www.redrocksonline.com/